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Welcome,

The Black Heritage Society of Washington State, Inc. was first proposed in 1977 and became incorporated in 1982.  Preserving, collecting and sharing the history of African Americans in Washington State are the priorities that shape the BHS mission.

BHS collections are a protected resource and public asset that archives the past and present to inform future generations. The Society recognizes the importance for documenting the culture and heritage of black people statewide, and upholds the notion that Washington State history is an essential link in the broader narrative that defines the story of our nation.

Preserving our past ~ Informing our future

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SAVE the DATE

FINAL MEMBERS MEETING OF THE YEAR

Saturday, November 16  2pm-4pm

  Hosted at The Central Area Senior Center – Supporting Our Community  More coming your way soon on this event.


 RESTORING the YWCA EAST CHERRY BRANCH to the PHYLLIS WHEATLEY BRANCH

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2019  2PM-4PM

A 100 year anniversary in the Central Area

The East Cherry Branch originated from the YWCA Culture Club. The Culture Club was founded in 1919 and located at 24th and Howell, providing one of the few public meeting places for the African American community at the time.
In 1947, the space moved to 2820 East Cherry and became the Phyllis Wheatley Branch of YWCA, one of the first interracial YWCA branches in the country.  
  • African Drumming by Maya Soleil
  • Food by That Brown Girl Catering

2820 East Cherry Street   Seattle, WA  98122


BHS COLLECTIONS UPDATES

Edwin T. Pratt (1930-1969)

     In 2017 it was our honor at BHS to acquire the Edwin T. Pratt Legacy Collection by generous donation of Mr. Pratt’s daughter and liaised by her godmother. The collection contains photographs, letters, handwritten speeches and other memorabilia that gives insight into the life and legacy of Mr. Pratt, a dedicated public servant, advocate for social justices and upon his death, Executive Director at the Seattle Urban League.
     This year, on the 50th anniversary of Pratt’s assassination, an assemblage of recently digitized images from the collection will enhance a video resource that will contribute to understanding the vision of  those who worked and dedicated themselves to Seattle’s civil rights movement.
The project is made possible in part by funds from King County 4Culture Heritage Grant.  
     Look for updates on the video project on this website.  In the meantime, please enjoy the short piece below produced by Pratt Fine Arts Center located in Seattle’s Central Area.  A link is also provided to an essay, Edwin T. Pratt: Excellence and Opportunity commissioned by Pratt Fine Arts Center and written by author, Nancy Rawles.